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Fig. 5 | Skeletal Muscle

Fig. 5

From: Immunohistochemical phenotyping of T cells, granulocytes, and phagocytes in the muscle of cancer patients: association with radiologically defined muscle mass and gene expression

Fig. 5

The presence of immune cells in the skeletal muscle tissue during cancer and the potential role of CD8 T cells in the muscle mass preservation. During cancer, changes in immune cell populations occur. Inflammatory mediators secreted by the tumor are capable of activating and mobilizing circulating and tissue-resident immune cells. The presence of T cells (CD8 and CD4) within the muscle tissue occurs in collaboration of antigen-presenting cells (i.e., dendritic cells) that travel from the tissues into the bloodstream and lymph nodes. Once in the muscle, cytokine secretion by T cells, granulocytes (i.e., neutrophils), and phagocytes (i.e., macrophages and dendritic cells) promote further recruitment and phenotype polarization (inflammatory or anti-inflammatory) of immune cells. A. Close-up of the muscle fiber and nucleus. Gene correlation analysis suggests an inverse relationship of CD8 T cells with diverse components (in red boxes) of muscle catabolic pathways which might impact muscle mass

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